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oatmeal chocolate orange cookies

Hey everyone, hope your all doing well? Works been a bit slow lately, but I'm not complaining cause I find it a bit boring. It has given me a chance to do a few things I've been meaning to catch up on... although I usually sit down just to do a quick e-mail check and it ends up turning into an hour.. sometimes more. It has come down to web surfing... I can't stop. There is just too many great blogs, sites, links from those sites and meaningless yet amusing other things to keep you hooked. Perhaps I should try limiting my computer usage time? Then I might be able to get more things done.

Enough of my rambling, lets get to these cookies! Flipping threw a old copy of Jamie Magazine, I fell upon these little jems, which he calls 'Any-way-you-like cookies'. All it really is a basic cookie dough recipe that you can add whatever flavors you fancy... like dark chocolate and orange perhaps?

basic cookie dough
115g unsalted butter, softened
100g unrefined organic cane sugar
1 large egg
100g plain flour, sifted
20g porridge oats
1/2 tsp baking powder
pinch of salt
dark chocolate & orange cookies
80g dark chocolate, chopped
zest of two oranges
vanilla coconut
60g shredded coconut
1 tsp vanilla extract

1. Place all the basic dough ingredients in a food processor and mix until smooth and creamy.
2. Add your chosen flavors to the mix and place in plastic wrap and roll into a 5cm-diameter sausage shape. Chill in the freezer for 20 min.
3. Preheat the oven to 350 F. Cut into 1cm slices onto a baking tin lined with parchment. Leave a good space between each - they'll spread out quite a bit while baking. Bake for 8-10 min or until edges get golden. These will been a thin crispy cookie.
makes 10-12 cookies

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